Want guidance and facts about Coronavirus? Ask the Local Experts.

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Local healthcare professionals who are ready to answer your personal questions and provide fact-based information and guidance.

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Life hasn’t been the same since COVID-19 (also known as Coronavirus) started wreaking havoc across the globe – shutting down entire cities and bringing economies to a screeching halt. As the situation evolves, more information becomes available. We know it has been tough sorting through all of it to find trustworthy and more importantly relevant information that applies to us here in East Africa. We are here to help!

We have partnered with local expert healthcare professionals who are ready to answer your personal questions and provide fact-based information and guidance. This is your chance to get real support from the comfort of your home without going to the hospital. Questions can cover any topic related to COVID-19 to support you and your loved ones stay safe during this time. 

Please submit your question in the comments section below or on Facebook and to be answered by our team of experts and at the end of each day we will be publishing answers to the most 5-10 most frequently asked questions.

Here is a short brief about each one of them:

1.Dr. Kebba Jobarteh, MD, MPH, Antara Health.

Dr. Jobarteh is Co-founder and CEO of Antara Health. Kebba is a practicing Paediatrician and was born in Kenya. Kebba holds an MD from Yale Medical School, an MPH from the Harvard School of Public Health, and an AB in Politics from Princeton University. Prior to Antara, Kebba launched national health programs in Malawi and Mozambique through Partners in Health and the US Centres for Disease Control and Prevention. 

2.Jason Carmichael, MPH, Tibu

Prior to co-founding TIBU, Jason worked on several outbreaks with World Health Organization (WHO) over the course of a 5-year period. This included responding to two Ebola outbreaks, Cholera, Polio and building management/operational capacity in our country offices across Africa. Jason is trained in Public Health and Epidemiology from the Faculty of Medicine at the University of British Columbia and absolutely loves the world of public health.

3.Eric Mbuthia, MD, MSc, Access Afya

Eric is a Medical doctor with 10 years experience as a General Practitioner here in Nairobi. He had a degree in Informatics from Swansea University in Wales. He leads the technical team for Access Afya - a network of tech-enabled clinics and pharmacies across Nairobi. 

If you have any burning medical questions, we suggest you use Access Afya’s Telemedicine helpline.

Again, please submit your question in the comments section below or on Facebook and we will share responses from our team of experts by the end of each day.

 

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Comments

    Elizabeth | June 05, 2020 15:57

    Wow this session is interesting,,,bt do corana virus have stages

    rose | May 04, 2020 21:39

    I oveit!

    Jimmy | May 01, 2020 04:41

    Iam under lockdown nothing to eat any help or grant to support please alert me

    Edmond | April 27, 2020 17:35

    What are some of the ways one can use to prevent further covid 19 infections?

    Edmond | April 27, 2020 17:33

    What are the symptoms of corona virus?

    Hilda | April 06, 2020 13:33

    Hallo, any hope for Covid-19 virus treatment soon? and is the trend getting worse or better

    ALEX | April 04, 2020 22:21

    Hello there, can someone infected by the corona-virus test negative at any stage of the disease?

    Okello | April 03, 2020 00:40

    How is Corona flu differ from the common cold flu......?

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    Faith | April 03, 2020 11:58

    Hello Okello. Here is your response from one of the clinicians. This is a great question. Since most people have never been exposed to the novel (meaning new) Coronavirus (SARS-CoV2), once they are exposed to the virus, their bodies do not have any antibodies that would help them prevent an infection from establishing itself. So, what then happens is that the virus infects the lungs and the body starts to fight the virus by mounting an immune response. The body’s response to this new virus is what causes an infected person to experience fever and some of the other symptoms such as fatigue and joint pains. Since the battleground between the virus and a person’s immune system is mostly in the lungs, that is why coughing and difficulty breathing are also very common symptoms. Think about it as the damage that happens to a field during a battle there. No matter who wins the battle, the grass suffers and there is lots of noise and smoke. Fortunately, the noise stops and the smoke clears, and almost always, the grass grows back. This is the case for the majority of people who get coronavirus and have symptoms. There are some other symptoms that some people with COVID19 patients experience. Up to 30% of people with coronavirus lose their sense of taste (dysgeusia) and lose their sense of smell (anosmia). Of note, most people with COVID19 do not get a runny nose and congestion because the infection is mostly one of the lower respiratory tract (lungs). But, for the most part, the symptoms of COVID19 are very similar to the symptoms of the common cold and the flu. The only way to figure out if a person has a cold, the flu or the coronavirus is by doing a test, which for now are only available for specific patients in Kenya. More than 80% of people with COVID19 have mild symptoms and then recover, presumably with some level of immunity to prevent reinfection from happening. This recovery happens because the body’s immune system is able to contain and eliminate the virus. Here is where the similarities between COVID19 and the flu stop. Up to 15% of people with COVID19 require some level of supportive care in a hospital. For the common flu, that number is 1-2% Also read through the other articles that we have on the platform and also look out for articles that we will be publishing to ensure that you have the right information at this time.

    SARAH | April 02, 2020 07:59

    Hi,am Sarah.I have a productive cough that will not go away for 2/52 now even after being on treatment.The cough is accompanied with a lot of sneezing and a running nose;no fever though in normal breathing pattern.The above symptoms makes me look like a suspect in the neighborhood,please advice

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    Faith | April 02, 2020 09:47

    Hello Sarah. We have an article on our website titled "Free COVID-19 Assessment Tool"the link in the Article will lead you to download the TIBU app App where is an assessment tool that you can take. Also take note of the following: If you think you have coronavirus infection because you have any of the following: Contact with confirmed or suspected case Fever, cough and difficulty breathing Please call the following HOTLINE NUMBER: 0800721316 (toll free), 0729471414, 0732353535 and inform them of the symptoms you are having. If you have any underlying risk factors Age greater than 60 Underlying cardiovascular conditions (High Blood Pressure, history of heart attack or stroke) Underlying immune disorders (HIV, history of cancer treatment,) Diabetes, please let the team members know so they can take appropriate measures. The people responsible for the COVID19 response in Kenya will then decide whether your symptoms history warrants a test. If so, they will arrange for you to receive a test and be potentially transferred to an isolation facility where you can be properly cared for and monitored. If you don’t meet criteria for a test, please plan on self-quarantining for 14 days and make sure that you know who you will call if your symptoms get worse, especially your respiratory effort (how hard it is to breathe). Call early, please do not wait until you are having worsening difficulty breathing to seek care. If you are having symptoms, try as best as possible to isolate yourself from other members of your household and wear a mask if you must come into contact with them at a distance less than 2 meters. The mask is to protect your family members from getting infected if you cough or sneeze. Wash hands frequently and try to minimize the amount of times you touch common surfaces in the home (ie: door knobs, kitchen counters etc.). If you are having symptoms and must go out of the house, please wear a mask to protect others.

    Anisetu | April 01, 2020 07:31

    Hi, By the time one is coughing after infected by CoVid19, how much damage has it caused into human lungs? how long does it take to cure?

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    Faith | April 02, 2020 09:37

    Hello Anisetu. Here is your response from one of the clinicians. Symptoms of coronavirus infection can begin 2-14 days after a person is exposed to the virus. Most people who develop symptoms begin to have those symptoms 4-6 days after exposure. For most people, symptoms last about 2 weeks but for people with severe (requiring hospitalization and oxygen support) or critical disease (requiring intensive care unit support and mechanical ventilation), recovery time is closer to 3-6 weeks. Most people with infection do not have any long-lasting damage done to their lungs at all. Of the small number of people that require mechanical ventilation as a result of COVID19, a small percentage of them do appear to have significant lung tissue scarring. Also read through the other articles that we have on the platform and look out as we will be sharing new articles daily.

    Evance | April 01, 2020 06:43

    Since the outbreak of covid-19 majority tend to suffer from common cold and coughs(flu- )what appears to be the sign of covid -19 how can we term this or we have the virus with us but now our immune is battling it out.

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    Faith | April 02, 2020 09:39

    Hello Evance. Here is your response from one of the clinicians. This is a great question. Since most people have never been exposed to the novel (meaning new) Coronavirus (SARS-CoV2), once they are exposed to the virus, their bodies do not have any antibodies that would help them prevent an infection from establishing itself. So, what then happens is that the virus infects the lungs and the body starts to fight the virus by mounting an immune response. The body’s response to this new virus is what causes an infected person to experience fever and some of the other symptoms such as fatigue and joint pains. Since the battleground between the virus and a person’s immune system is mostly in the lungs, that is why coughing and difficulty breathing are also very common symptoms. Think about it as the damage that happens to a field during a battle there. No matter who wins the battle, the grass suffers and there is lots of noise and smoke. Fortunately, the noise stops and the smoke clears, and almost always, the grass grows back. This is the case for the majority of people who get coronavirus and have symptoms. There are some other symptoms that some people with COVID19 patients experience. Up to 30% of people with coronavirus lose their sense of taste (dysgeusia) and lose their sense of smell (anosmia). Of note, most people with COVID19 do not get a runny nose and congestion because the infection is mostly one of the lower respiratory tract (lungs). But, for the most part, the symptoms of COVID19 are very similar to the symptoms of the common cold and the flu. The only way to figure out if a person has a cold, the flu or the coronavirus is by doing a test, which for now are only available for specific patients in Kenya. More than 80% of people with COVID19 have mild symptoms and then recover, presumably with some level of immunity to prevent reinfection from happening. This recovery happens because the body’s immune system is able to contain and eliminate the virus. Here is where the similarities between COVID19 and the flu stop. Up to 15% of people with COVID19 require some level of supportive care in a hospital. For the common flu, that number is 1-2%. Also read through the articles that we have made available to you on our website and look out for me as we will continue sharing so as to ensure that you have the right information at this time.

    FAITH | March 31, 2020 09:05

    Awesome work Fuzu and Partners! The Kenyan Community definitely needs the correct information at this time.

    muthoni | March 31, 2020 08:55

    Hi. Is covid 19 airborne. And so is it advisable that we wear masks while stepping outside??

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    Faith | March 31, 2020 13:07

    Hello Evelyn. One of the Clinicians from our partners will be getting back to your question in another article with the responses. In the meantime, please have a look at the other articles that we have also have available.

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    Faith | April 01, 2020 09:54

    Hello Muthoni. Here is your response from one of the clinicians. Airborne spread has not been reported for COVID-19 and it is not believed to be a major driver of transmission based on available evidence Please also have a look at the other articles that we have and look out for more so as to have the right information at this time for you and your loved ones.

    Allan | March 31, 2020 08:21

    Thank you for this. Very insightful.

    Evelyn | March 31, 2020 06:45

    What precautions can I take if I have breathing problems due to Covid-19 in the house as I wait for the Meds to arrive?

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    Faith | March 31, 2020 13:06

    Hello Evelyn. One of the Clinicians from our partners will be getting back to you. In the meantime, please have a look at the other articles that we have also have available.

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    Faith | April 01, 2020 09:56

    Hello Evelyn. Here is your response from one of our clinicians. First of all: It is extremely important to not panic and to stay calm, this can prevent you from making your situation worse. Settle down comfortably (a half-sitting position) Release your clothing Avoid any effort If necessary, lean forward slightly Call an emergency number Kindly also have a look at the articles that we have and look out for more so as to stay in the know.

    Evelyn | March 31, 2020 06:36

    Can the Virus mutate to a point where our bodies are immune?

    Titus | March 30, 2020 20:17

    How do we increase our chances of preventing Coronavirus infection? What extra measure is required?

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    Faith | March 31, 2020 12:53

    Hello Titus. We hope that we can be your trusted source of information at this time. Check the article titled "Answering your Coronavirus questions | Access Afya" for your response

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    Faith | April 01, 2020 09:59

    Hello Titus. Here is your response from one of our clinicians. he mainstays to infection prevention and to slow transmission of COVID-19 remain Washing your hands regularly with soap and water or cleaning them with an alcohol-based sanitiser. Keeping at least 2 metres distance between you and people who are coughing or sneezing. Avoiding touching your face. Covering your nose and mouth when coughing or sneezing. Practising social distancing by minimising unnecessary travel and avoiding large gatherings of people Kindly also have a look at the articles that we have and look out for more from our partners so as to stay informed at this time.

    Conrad | March 30, 2020 16:09

    If one requires hospitalization due to inability to breathe well, what's the typical treatment protocol (prior to intubation)?

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    Faith | March 31, 2020 13:06

    Hello Conrad. One of the Clinicians from our partners will be getting back to you. In the meantime, please have a look at the other articles that we have also have available.

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    Faith | April 01, 2020 09:55

    Hello Conrad. Here is your response from one of the Clinicians. Practically, non-invasive techniques can be used in non-severe forms of respiratory failure: Patients should receive in that case oxygen therapy by the use of oxygen masks or nasal prongs and require to be monitored very closely. Note: If the scenario does not improve or even worsen within a short period of time (1–2 hours) the mechanical ventilation must be preferred. Kindly also have a look at the other articles that we have and look out for more.

    Conrad | March 30, 2020 16:06

    There are a bunch of clinical trials ongoing to help validate what anti-virals may help with treating (if not "curing") Covid-19. Two questions: (1) how long would many of these clinical trials take before results come in (either positive or negative) - can we expect mid April some initial conclusions on many of studied pharmacologics? And (2) should some of these (Camostat Mesylate, Favipiravir, Ritonavir/Lopinavir -and, of course, the infamous hydroxychloroquine+Azythromycin, etc) prove to be beneficial, what is Kenya's ability to either source or manufacture these in bulk?

    James | March 30, 2020 16:05

    Is it true that men are more vulnerable to Covid 19?

    MATUKU | March 30, 2020 15:37

    Which DIY home cures would you recommend for prevention?

    Esbon | March 30, 2020 15:03

    There have been some reports of re-infections with patients who had recovered and had been considered immune. Would the second infection be more severe than the first?

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    Faith | March 31, 2020 13:10

    Hello Esbon. One of the Clinicians from our partners will be getting back to your question in another article with the responses. In the meantime, please have a look at the other articles that we have also have available.

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    Faith | April 01, 2020 10:04

    Hello Esbon. Here is your response from one of the clinicians. There still is not enough evidence that recovering from COVID-19 illness induces long-term immunity. So far, testing in animals suggests that immunity is developed. However, it is still early to determine if the immunity developed is long-term and what that would look like as the virus mutates. The tests for COVID-19 have a specificity of about 90%. This means that there is a 10% chance that a still positive case would be recorded as being negative. It was noticed that patients who initially tested negative would have a subsequent positive test. The current criteria for recovery is two negative tests taken at least 24 hours apart. Typically, infection by a strain of a virus and recovery normally results in immunity to that specific strain. We see this typically with the viral/seasonal flu caused by the influenza virus. Infection by one strain confers lifetime immunity to that strain. As the virus mutates and new strains appear, these new strains cause new infections. The common cold, a different kind of virus, caused by another kind of coronavirus induces immunity that is relatively short-lived for about 3 months. Also have use the other articles that we have and look out for more as we ensure that you have access to the right information at this time.

    Ann | March 30, 2020 14:54

    What are the chances of recovery should someone get it? Everyone is telling us how not to get it but what happens no one is talking about what to do when you get.

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    Faith | March 31, 2020 13:10

    Hello Ann. One of the Clinicians from our partners will be getting back to your question in another article with the responses. In the meantime, please have a look at the other articles that we have also have available.

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    Faith | April 02, 2020 09:43

    Hello Ann. Here is your response from one of the clinicians The chances of recovery from COVID are very, very good. Most people recover with no long lasting effects. In fact, more than 80% of people recover after having only mild symptoms. Of the remaining 15% that have severe symptoms, 10% require only a short stay in the hospital and some supplemental oxygen to make sure their bodies are receiving the oxygen required to contain and control the virus. That being said, approximately 4% of people do require mechanical ventilation to survive. Mechanical ventilation is necessary when you are no longer able to breathe effectively on your own. Most of the people in the world that have required both supplemental oxygen and mechanical ventilation have had underlying risk factors. The common risk factors are: Age greater than 60 Underlying cardiovascular conditions (High Blood Pressure, history of heart attack or stroke) Underlying immune disorders (HIV, history of cancer treatment,) Diabetes The information we have comes mostly from China and increasingly Europe and the United States. Experts are very worried that underlying rates of HIV, TB infection and malnutrition in many African countries will make larger numbers of people susceptible to severe disease. We hope that will not be the case, but at the moment, we just don’t know. Even with these relatively high rates of hospitalization, more than 95% of people who get infected with the coronavirus recover without complications. Of those without any need for hospitalization, there do not appear to be any long term effects of coronavirus infection and there is no evidence that lung scarring is a problem. For those that recover after requiring brief supportive care and oxygen support, it also appears that there is no evidence of long-term scarring. For those people who do require mechanical ventilation, there is evidence that lung scarring can be a problem. At this point it is unclear if that is as a direct result of the viral infection, or a result of the need for mechanical ventilation itself. If you think you have coronavirus infection because you have any of the following: Contact with confirmed or suspected case Fever, cough and difficulty breathing Please call the following HOTLINE NUMBER: 0800721316 (toll free), 0729471414, 0732353535 and inform them of the symptoms you are having. If you have any underlying risk factors (listed above), please let the team members know so they can take appropriate measures. The people responsible for the COVID19 response in Kenya will then decide whether your symptoms history warrants a test. If so, they will arrange for you to receive a test and be potentially transferred to an isolation facility where you can be properly cared for and monitored. If you don’t meet criteria for a test, please plan on self-quarantining for 14 days and make sure that you know who you will call if your symptoms get worse, especially your respiratory effort (how hard it is to breathe). Call early, please do not wait until you are having worsening difficulty breathing to seek care. If you are having symptoms, try as best as possible to isolate yourself from other members of your household and wear a mask if you must come into contact with them at a distance less than 2 meters. The mask is to protect your family members from getting infected if you cough or sneeze. Wash hands frequently and try to minimize the amount of times you touch common surfaces in the home (ie: door knobs, kitchen counters etc.). If you are having symptoms and must go out of the house, please wear a mask to protect others.

    Ian Oscar | March 30, 2020 13:58

    How do you I treat Covid 19 from Home? what are the best practices while self-isolating?

    Alvin | March 30, 2020 13:30

    Is it safer to wear gloves or to wear a mask if out in public? Or both?

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    Faith | March 31, 2020 13:09

    Hello Alvin. One of the Clinicians from our partners will be getting back to your question in another article with the responses. In the meantime, please have a look at the other articles that we have also have available.

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    Faith | April 03, 2020 10:14

    Hello Alvin. Here is your response from one of the clinicians. People can catch SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19 illness from others who have the virus. The disease can spread from person to person through small droplets from the nose or mouth which are spread when a person with COVID-19 infection coughs or exhales. These droplets land on objects and surfaces around the person. Other people then catch COVID-19 by touching these objects or surfaces, then touching their eyes, nose or mouth. People can also catch COVID-19 if they breathe in droplets from a person with COVID-19 who coughs out or exhales droplets. The recommendation is to stay indoors and to minimise non-essential movement. Where this is unavoidable, social distancing measures such as maintaining a minimum 6 feet (2m) distance between you and others is key. This means avoiding brushing past people in the streets or supermarket aisles and maintaining the same distance when in queues (eg. at the supermarket). Keeping the minimum distance between yourself and others reduces the risk of droplets transferring to you. The initial advice on masks is that masks are reserved for either healthy people taking care of people with COVID-19 (mask acts as a barrier) or for ill people who are coughing or sneezing to reduce the risk of transmitting the virus to those who do not have it (the mask would trap infectious droplets). Wearing of masks and gloves for the majority of people may be ineffective and potentially contribute to more infections. Many people are likely to not follow the correct advice on wearing a mask, constantly readjusting the mask which has potential to contaminate them. The World Health Organisation (WHO) recommends use of masks if you suspect you are infected. In its announcement on April 2nd 2020, the Kenyan government has recommended that all public transport users will be required to wear face masks when travelling. Face masks are only as effective if used correctly. This means being worn correctly, consistently (it is not ok to wear a mask and decide to take it off; it must be worn full-time when out in public) and removed/disposed of safely if they become moist. Masks must be used in combination with good universal hygiene practices. To reduce the risk of infection and slow transmission of COVID-19, the advice remains to keep your distance, wash your hands and do not touch your face. Also look at the other articles that we have on the website and also look out for other articles that we will published.

    ROGER | March 30, 2020 13:27

    Can you have COVID-19 and show no symptoms?

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    Faith | March 31, 2020 12:59

    Hello Roger. We hope that we can be your trusted source of information at this time. Check the article titled "Answering your Coronavirus questions | Access Afya" for your response

    Luizer | March 30, 2020 13:20

    Normally children and older generation are more susceptible to infections, how come with this strain only older generation seem to be dying more?

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    Faith | March 31, 2020 13:10

    Hello Luizer. One of the Clinicians from our partners will be getting back to your question in another article with the responses. In the meantime, please have a look at the other articles that we have also have available.

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    Faith | April 01, 2020 09:53

    Hello Luizer. Here's your response from one of the Clinicians from our partners. The virus is so new that we don’t really know. The fact that very few children have severe Covid-19 infection so far suggests that there is something fundamentally different about the way they are handling the virus. The first suggestion is that there are many ways in which the immune system of a child differs from that of an adult, not least because the immune system of children is still very much a work in progress: children, especially those in nursery or school, are exposed to a large number of novel respiratory infections and this might result in them having higher baseline levels of antibodies against viruses than adults. The second suggestion related to that difference between children and adults could be put down to the ageing of the immune system. Other reasons are suggested but are more technical. One of these suggestions is that the virus needs a protein on the surface of a cell called a receptor, to get into the inside of a cell and start causing problems. It may be that children have less of these receptors in their lower airways (lungs) than in their upper airways (nose, mouths and throats), which is why they are most often showing mild symptoms as it is their upper airways that are predominantly affected. Additionally, other studies suggest that because children have fewer chronic cardiovascular and respiratory conditions, they are more resilient to severe coronavirus infection than elderly adults. However It is important to remember that we know very little about this virus. Scientists are still speculating in terms of trying to understand why we are seeing the epidemiology that we are seeing and many studies and researches are still ongoing. Also have a look at the other articles that we have and look out for more.

    Patricia | March 30, 2020 13:15

    Would the virus have a more worse impact on people with existing chronic conditions like diabetes?

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    Faith | March 31, 2020 12:10

    Hello Patricia We hope that we can be your trusted source of information at this time. Check the article titled "Answering your Coronavirus questions | Access Afya" for your response

    Nick | March 30, 2020 13:09

    Can I Improve my Immune against the Virus by Working out and Eating a Balanced Diet? Also whats the effectiveness of Vitamin C in Matters Covid?

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    Faith | April 01, 2020 10:06

    Hello Nick. Here is your response from one of our clinicians. Healthy people tend to develop only mild forms of the disease, though there have been a few cases where young, healthy people have gone on to develop severe disease. Leading a healthy lifestyle including maintaining a healthy diet and fitness would reduce your risk of getting severe disease. The mainstays to infection prevention and to slow transmission of COVID-19 remain Washing your hands regularly with soap and water or cleaning them with an alcohol-based sanitiser. Keeping at least 2 metres distance between you and people who are coughing or sneezing. Avoiding touching your face. Covering your nose and mouth when coughing or sneezing. Practising social distancing by minimising unnecessary travel and avoiding large gatherings of people. Also read through the articles that we have made available on our website and look out for more so as to ensure that you have the right information at this time.

    RUTH | March 30, 2020 13:06

    How susceptible to Covid are individuals who suffer from allergies like chronic Rhinitis?

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    Faith | March 31, 2020 11:47

    Hello Ruth. We hope that we can be your trusted source of information at this time. Check the article titled "Answering your Coronavirus questions | Access Afya" for your response

    James | March 30, 2020 13:03

    In the event that an employee of an organization gets Covid 19 , what is your advice to the employer to ensure the well being of the staff?

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    Faith | March 31, 2020 11:38

    Hello James. We hope that we can be your trusted source of information at this time. Check the article titled "Answering your Coronavirus questions | Access Afya" for your response

    Sharon | March 30, 2020 12:28

    How long does it tale to recover from the disease?

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    Faith | March 31, 2020 11:38

    Hello Sharon. We hope that we can be your trusted source of information at this time. Check the article titled "Answering your Coronavirus questions | Access Afya" for your response.

    Ngatia | March 30, 2020 11:45

    How can I self test if I haven't felt the Corona symptoms yet?

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    Faith | March 31, 2020 10:39

    Hello Ngatia. We hope that we can be your trusted source of information at this time. Check the article titled "Answering your Coronavirus questions | Access Afya" for your response

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    Faith | April 01, 2020 10:02

    Hello Ngatia. Here is a response from one of the clinicians. Confirmation of infection begins with screening first for suspect cases, which then receive a confirmatory test. Suspect cases are first identified through screening which evaluates for common symptoms (fever, cough, difficulty breathing) and potential positive contact history. In limited resource settings such as ours, the advice has been for clinicians to use their judgement to determine if a patient has signs and symptoms compatible with COVID-19 and whether the patient should be tested. Testing priority has so far been initially given to those hospitalised, those with pre-existing conditions and immunosuppressed states (compromised immunity) and healthcare workers who are in direct contact with suspect or confirmed cases. In Kenya, testing is being largely coordinated centrally by the National Influenza Centre Laboratory. In a bid to ramp up testing, countries like the United Kingdom have launched home testing kits to faster identify cases; these, however, are not locally available. Should symptoms appear, contact your nearest healthcare provider or the COVID-19 hotline for initial evaluation and guidance on next steps. Please also have a look at the other articles that we have and look out for more as we ensure that you have access to the right information at this time.

    Consolata | March 30, 2020 07:37

    I have heard some people sharing cases of having covid like symptoms over the past few months only for those symptoms to disappear; People say that what they went through was no normal flu(i had it too at some point)could it be that this virus has been with us all along but it hits harder among other people than it does others?

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    Faith | March 31, 2020 10:39

    Hello Consolata. We hope that we can be your trusted source of information at this time. Check the article titled "Answering your Coronavirus questions | Access Afya" for your response

    Jackline | March 29, 2020 08:53

    What are the signs and symptoms of Covid 19

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    Faith | March 31, 2020 10:37

    Hello Jackline. We hope that Fuzu can be your trusted source of information at this time. Check the article titled "Answering your Coronavirus questions | Access Afya" for your response

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    Faith | March 31, 2020 10:40

    For more information, also have a look at the other articles from our partners on COVID 19.


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